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Drosera aberrans

Drosera aberrans is a species closely related to Drosera whittakeri, Drosera schmutzii and Drosera praefolia. It is also often referred to as Drosera whittakeri ssp. aberrans.
Quite typical for this species is the ready formation of additional tubers via lateral stolons and some additional plants may appear towards the second half of the growing season. It produces few single flowers from the center of the rosette and only opens them one at the time.

The tubers are often orange and the may sometimes be covered by dark papery sheats from previous year's tubers. Tubers of this species seem to need some residual moisture as they seem to desiccate more easily compared to most other species.

You can find a full description of this species here: http://www.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0018/95400/Tel122147Low.pdf: Lowrie and Conran, A review of Drosera whittakeri s. lat. (Droseraceae) and description of a new species from Kangaroo Island, South Australia, Telopea 2008, 12(2), 147165; (file size 2.5 MB)



tubers TUB128

tubers Maldon form

lateral stolon Maldon form

lateral stolons Pyrete Ranges

lateral stolons Pyrete Ranges



Currently I grow several different forms. Two of them (TUB010 and TUB128), which may or may not be the same, get a deep red colouration when subjected to intense light. Others stay completely green like the Maldon form or get a touch of orange like a form from the Pyrete Ranges.

TUB010

TUB128

TUB128

TUB128

Maldon form

Maldon form

plant Pyrete Ranges, VIC

flower Pyrete Ranges, VIC

single seedling

seedlings



I wrote above that the Maldon form stays green or at least greenish which was the case in my conditions for the past 2-3 season since I obtained it. The 2013/2014 season is completely different as the plants have started with green leaves, but then developed a maroon colour.

Maldon form

Maldon form





D. aberrans from Monarto, S. A.

This fascinating form is smaller than the other D. aberrans forms I grow. The flowers are larger in diameter than the plants.

plant

plant

plant

plant

plant

plant

plant

plant

plant

Drosera aberrans from Monarto, S. A. in different stages of development. As you can see in the pictures, the plant is smaller than the flower.

 

 





 

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